Indian matchmaker TV series stokes debate on arranged marriages

This book is an extensive and thorough exploration of the ways in which the middle class in India select their spouse. Using the prism of matchmaking, this book critically unpacks the concept of the ‘modern’ and traces the importance of moralities and values in the making of middle class identities, by bringing to the fore intersections and dynamics of caste, class, gender, and neoliberalism. The author discusses a range of issues: romantic relationships among youth, use of online technology and of professional services like matrimonial agencies and detective agencies, encounters of love and heartbreak, impact of experiences of pain and humiliation on spouse-selection, and the involvement of family in matchmaking. Based on this comprehensive account, she elucidates how the categories of ‘love’ and ‘arranged’ marriages fall short of explaining, in its entirety and essence, the contemporary process of spouse-selection in urban India. Though the ethnographic research has been conducted in India, this book is of relevance to social scientists studying matchmaking practices, youth cultures, modernity and the middle class in other societies, particularly in parts of Asia. While being based on thorough scholarship, the book is written in accessible language to appeal to a larger audience. Jindal Global University, India.

New dating app is like the Tinder of arranged marriages

While it is a regressive thought, and not the only one such in the show, Taparia shines light on a phenomenon quite prevalent across the social strata in India. Except the algorithm is decided by Taparia, the globe-trotting successful matchmaker from Mumbai. Of course, she is aided by her face reader, astrologer, and at times life coach.

But the Netflix show ends up glorifying all that is wrong with how Indians view the institution of marriage, often without context. For me, what stood out was how the show deals with three female clients of Sima Taparia. She is made to appear as obnoxious because she is sure of what she wants, a woman who is ambitious and is unwilling to compromise on the qualities she wants in a partner.

Theirs was one of a growing number of “semi-arranged” marriages in which technology has played matchmaker, helping whittle away at an Still, by allowing the Internet to nudge its way into the marriage equation, parents.

These men and women — or boys and girls, as they are referred to in Indian society, perhaps to reinforce their youth and innocence — of Indian origin are in their 20s and 30s, living in India and the US. Credit: Netflix. Indian Matchmaking just takes this concept further. Of course, each of these comes with their own good, bad and ugly. I think the entire experience felt like going on a journey with no idea as to what could turn up next.

There have always been matchmakers and, more recently, marriage agencies that connected families. And every Indian family has a Sima Mami who offers women unsolicited, and often blunt, advice to wear more make-up, or hit the gym to lose weight, if they ever hope to get married. Despite this sociocultural context, Indian Matchmaking has generated a lot of outrage, with critics and viewers alike accusing the show of playing up — or, at the very least, not critiquing — everything regressive in Indian society.

Words like hate-watch and cringe-fest have regularly featured on social media.

Netflix’s “Indian Matchmaking” Tells Women to Compromise. I Refused to Do That.

It has also put the spotlight on reality shows and how they spin a particular narrative at the cost of others. The show seems to be tailor-made for a western audience and portrays arranged marriages in a positive way while underplaying issues of casteism, misogyny and heteronormativity. At the centre of the show is matchmaker Sima Taparia, whose clients include well-off Indians living in the USA or in cosmopolitan cities across India.

Indian Matchmaking treads into dangerous territory when it allows Sima Taparia Matchmaking is this year’s scariest horror story about arranged marriages Find latest and upcoming tech gadgets online on Tech2 Gadgets.

Love actually! The times are changing, but slowly. Singh, who works at a government regulatory organisation, had one non-negotiable condition. She would not give up her job. Her parents were keen on the caste factor but soon gave in to what she wanted. So, Singh met and interacted with at least 10 men, some for even a few months, before zeroing in on Aditya Fogat, now her husband.

They got married within 10 months of meeting but not before falling in love with each other. Delhi-based business consultant Mudit Varshney got married last month. Treading the fine line between tradition and modernity, people like Singh and Varshney are among those who believe emotional and intellectual compatibility take precedence over social factors like caste, and aligned goals and ambitions are a priority over physical attributes like complexion and height. Parents know best, but when it comes to choosing their better halves, the brides and grooms know better.

And while the process might begin clinically, almost like a business deal, falling in love, whether it takes a few days or a couple of years, is mandatory. Shivdasani, however, noted that while there were couples who would get married within a few months of having known each other, it was best to wait at least a year before tying the knot.

Unless You’re Brown, ‘Indian Matchmaking’ Is Not Yours to Criticize

Netflix show Indian Matchmaking is a desi reality that is evenly wedged between horror and rom-com. It follows a series of bachelors, bachelorettes and divorcees, living in the US and India who have been mollycoddled into choosing a partner by their families with the help of an Indian matchmaker. Twitter has come down heavily with reactions to the show — some furious about the cringeworthy moments and the judgemental, haphazard dialogues carelessly littered throughout the show.

Read ‘Indian Matchmaking‘: Netizens react to ‘cringy’ yet ‘fascinating’ Netflix reality show. Viewers are calling it a depiction of everything people hate about Indian culture, one viewer tweeted:.

Four Indian couples who had arranged marriages share their The series, which follows Mumbai matchmaker Sima Taparia as she connects connected online and their communication continued virtually for three months.

This book is an extensive and thorough exploration of the ways in which the middle class in India select their spouse. Using the prism of matchmaking, this book critically unpacks the concept of the ‘modern’ and traces the importance of moralities and values in the making of middle class identities, by bringing to the fore intersections and dynamics of caste, class, gender, and neoliberalism. The author discusses a range of issues: romantic relationships among youth, use of online technology and of professional services like matrimonial agencies and detective agencies, encounters of love and heartbreak, impact of experiences of pain and humiliation on spouse-selection, and the involvement of family in matchmaking.

Based on this comprehensive account, she elucidates how the categories of ‘love’ and ‘arranged’ marriages fall short of explaining, in its entirety and essence, the contemporary process of spouse-selection in urban India. Though the ethnographic research has been conducted in India, this book is of relevance to social scientists studying matchmaking practices, youth cultures, modernity and the middle class in other societies, particularly in parts of Asia.

While being based on thorough scholarship, the book is written in accessible language to appeal to a larger audience. Jindal Global University, India. She was also a Visiting Scholar at St. Only valid for books with an ebook version. Springer Reference Works and instructor copies are not included. JavaScript is currently disabled, this site works much better if you enable JavaScript in your browser.

Cultural and Media Studies. Free Preview. Buy eBook.

Meet someone for keeps

The Mumbai-based matchmaker Sima Taparia delivers this meme-friendly one-liner in the seventh episode of the hit Netflix series Indian Matchmaking. But she departs from this well-worn model in her attention to one extra characteristic: caste. This silent shadow hangs over every luxurious living room she leads viewers into.

At the centre of this great Indian arranged marriage circus is Tapadia, whose popularity But is she the main “villain” in Indian Matchmaking?

The eight-part series – Indian Matchmaking premiered on Netflix on Thursday and is currently among its top ranked India shows The show is created by Oscar-nominated director Smriti Mundhra. A new Netflix show about an Indian matchmaker catering to the high demands of potential brides and grooms, and their parents, has stoked an online debate about arranged marriages in the country. The eight-part series “Indian Matchmaking” premiered on Netflix on Thursday and is currently among its top ranked India shows.

It features Sima Taparia, a real-life matchmaker from Mumbai, who offers her services to families within India and abroad. Arranged marriages in India see parents leading efforts to find a suitable match for their children. The show has become a subject of memes and jokes, and criticism, on how individuals and their parents are picky and have a long list of demands that centre around factors like caste, height or skin colour. The show “makes very clear how regressive Indian communities can be.

‘Indian Matchmaking’: Is arranged marriage out of place in 2020? Or still a way to find love?

Reading it reminded him of a period in my life, my mids, when we were searching for a groom for me. I am a South Indian who grew up in Mumbai. But of course, I had to track it down.

But its efforts to dodge the uncomfortable realities of a tradition rooted in a cultural web of misogyny, colourism and casteism hasn’t gone.

To her surprise, the year-old met her future husband and is set to get married in January next year. Mumbai-based Anindita Dey—married for over a year now — also met her husband through her parents. However, Anindita makes it clear that while it was her parents who set up the meeting, the final decision was completely hers. Louis Superman, which she shared with Sami Khan. Because Indian Matchmaking follows matchmaker Sima Taparia analysing families and boys and girls to find suitable matches.

In an age when people believed to be largely pushing away the stereotypes, breaking free from the regressive patriarchal mind-set of society, this show throws light on the ugly truth of Indian matchmaking. In other words, it hits the bullseye when showcasing the circus that Indian marriages, mostly considering how even the most well-to-do families can’t still avoid checking the kundali, complexion or height among other conventional criteria. But it simultaneously hurts because it is the reality that people face once in their lifetimes and want to forget.

Sima Taparia, who has been a matchmaker since , finds nothing backward in her business. In India anyway, 50 percent are love marriages but people mostly want arranged ones, as those marriages last long. No matter how much the show makes one twitch, the truth is that a large population of Indians still opt for an arranged marriage.

Despite Twitter rants on the show, calling it out for promoting colourism, cast and beauty standards, Indian Matchmaking elucidates the reality of Indian household loud and clear on the screen.

Arranged Marriage – matchmaking, chemistry & compatibility